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2011 Iowa Custody Study

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 Preserving the parent-child relationship in separated families!

 

Joint Physical Care Research

 

Research by Drs. Judith Wallerstein and Joan Berlin Kelly revealed that 50% of mothers either saw no value in the father's contact with his children and actively tried to sabotage it, or resented the father's contact (Source: Separated Parenting Access and Resource Center, 2006).

 

Almost 40% of the custodial wives reported that they had refused at least once to let their ex-husbands see the children, and admitted that their reasons had nothing to do with the children's wishes or the children's safety, but were somehow punitive in nature (Source: Separated Parenting Access and Resource Center, 2006).

 

Fulton reported that 53% of non-custodial fathers claimed their ex-wives had refused to let them see their children (Source: Separated Parenting Access and Resource Center, 2006).

 

It is NEVER in the child's best interest to withhold visitation or to make it unnecessarily difficult for the other parent to spend time with the child, just for the purpose of punishing or getting even with the other parent.  Even if you are not receiving child support, the child needs to spend time with the other parent (Source: Separated Parenting Access and Resource Center, 2006).

 

Some of the methods used to discourage contact are forgotten appointments, insistence on rigid schedules for visits, refusal to permit the visit of the father brought an adult friend, a thousand mischievous, mostly petty devices designed to humiliate the visiting parent and to deprecate him in the eyes of his children (Source: Separated Parenting Access and Resource Center, 2006).

 

Consider this statistic when you are tempted to use the child to punish the other parent (Source: Separated Parenting Access and Resource Center, 2006).

 

The decision to keep the child with the mother is theoretically made in the best interest of the child; however, when children were surveyed later in life, fewer than half felt their mother's motives had anything to do with their best interests, only a quarter felt it was because their mother loved them (Source: Separated Parenting Access and Resource Center, 2006).


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